Archive for January, 2010

Attending Intel Youth Rockstars Summit

I’m attending a small youth tech conference at Intel tomorrow. From Intel: “This event will bring a few of our favorite bloggers reaching youth audiences to experience some of the newest developments in Intel technology, including the widget television, mobile devices for students on-the-go, gaming and more!”

Continue reading

Drew Houston Berkeley eTalk Highlights

Drew Houston, the founder & CEO of Dropbox gave a talk tonight on the UC Berkeley campus. I could only attend the last half of the talk and there should be a video later (watch Hacker News for it). Here are my favorite bits in no particular order:

  1. Own your name

    Dropbox has always been called Dropbox but until recently, their main domain was getdropbox.com. If you don’t own yourcompany.com, everyone from Paul Graham to Sequoia partners will tell you to fix that. If you have money, that means get it. If you don’t, that means get a new name. What does that say for the Lighthouse’s (lighthouseapp.com) and Basecamp’s (bascamphq.com) of the world? Drew says: just do the math on how much business you lose and how many emails are bounced because people hear about your great company but end up at the wrong domain.

    I’m thinking of applying this to every new project I start: pick a good name that’s available, buy the domain, and name the repository after it. After all, how many companies have successfully navigated the branding nightmare of a name change?

    Continue reading

Things startups (really) do and don’t need

Things startups do and don’t need just popped up on Hacker News. I agree with the majority of the list but I feel strongly about the following:

You do not need:

  1. Good coffee maker
    Make tea by boiling water, it’s less expensive and healthier.
  2. Video game system
    Games are too distracting, leave them at home, don’t try to keep people in the office.
  3. Beer on Fridays
    As a co-founder who doesn’t drink, I wouldn’t appreciate regularly encouraging my employees to do so or trying to force friendships during happy hour. If people are friendly, they can be friendly over drinks that aren’t on the company tab.

Continue reading